Saving Money on Housing: Travel Hacks for the Frequent Traveler or Nomad

I’ve been a full-time nomad traveling the U.S. since September 2020, and I’ve learned (and surely nobody is surprised): that hotels, housing, and accommodations are by far the biggest expense of nomad life. I have a $2,000 monthly budget for lodging, but my actual spending in that area depends on the cost of living in the city that I’m visiting and the type of accommodations I choose (which, hooray, I have complete control over)! Fellow travelers, you have a lot of choice if you do a little research. The first question: Airbnb or hotel? Let me share my methods and we can explore a few aspects of each.

Does It Cost a Lot of Money to Travel Full-Time as a Nomad? Myths and Truths

When I tell people I’m a nomad that travels full-time, they either think I’m a vanlifer who only eats ramen (the cheap kind, not the good kind) or that I must be staying in posh places and spending a lot of money. Well, false on both counts! I’m here to say: it can, but it doesn’t have to cost a lot of money to be a gypsy. So, let’s talk comparisons, facts, and figures… time to break out the spreadsheet!

Downsizing into my SUV: My Methodical Approach to Getting Rid of Stuff

July 24, 2020: My 35th birthday AND the day my house went under contract. My dream of traveling full-time as a gypsy, vagabonding nomad was right there on the horizon... and the only thing in the way of ultimate freedom? A house-full of stuff. I had 7 weeks until closing. So how did I decide what would go and what would stay?

An Open Letter to the Local Men I Meet During Nomad Life

I don’t believe in long distance relationships. A satisfying relationship requires two bodies in the same room, in addition to things like shared interests and goals. Looking into each other’s eyes not through a screen. Being able to reach out and touch one another, instead of longing to someday soon feel their touch. I think most people who’ve been in long distance relationships would agree. However, the traditional implication is that these two people are separate, stationary, and confined by their geography. But... What if one of them is not?